JACK RUBY'S POLYGRAPH TEST

FROM THE FINAL REPORT OF THE HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS, p.159:

On July 18 1964, Jack Ruby voluntarily took a polygraph examination to test his truthfulness. Even though the Warren Commission disclaimed any reliance on the results of the test, the committee believed that popular interest in such tests, as well as the possibility that new investigative "leads" might emerge, warranted a review of the examination.

The committee was specifically prohibited by its own rules from using either failure or agreement to take a polygraph examination, or the results of a polygraph examination, as a basis for fact-finding in any public hearing or report. Such restrictions did not apply, however, to a review of polygraph tests previously administered. The committee therefore engaged a panel of experts to review the Ruby polygraph examination to determine if it was properly conducted and analyzed.

A POLYGRAPH EXAMINATION

A polygraph examination records physiological responses to questions asked. The polygraphist attempts to design the examination in such a way that the truthful person will react to the control questions and the lying person to the relevant questions.

The test structure must be constructed so that it poses a threat to both the truthful and untruthful person. The polygraphist attempts to determine the "psychological set" of the examinee. He tries to determine, by reading the physiological activity of the examinee in the polygraph charts, what questions or question areas pose the greatest threat to the examinee's well being. A "psychological set" is "a permission disclaimed any reliance on the results of the test, the son's fears, anxieties, and apprehensions, [which] are channeled toward that situation causing the greatest threat to the individual's well-being. He will tune in on that which is of a greater threat, and tune out that of a lesser threat...

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